Star of David Necklaces

For 14K gold Stars, please scroll down.

 

FREE SHIPPING FOR ORDERS OVER $100

 

Modern star of David

Item Number NK 055

Click on photo for details

 

1 1/16", Sterling Silver, with enamel 

surrounding a 9K solid small Star.

Price: $ 145

 Enamel color

  

Star of David necklace

Item Number NK 057

Click on photo for details

 

1", Sterling Silver, and Semi precious round stone set in 9K gold.  7 different stones available- click here

Price: $ 169.95

 Stone

Item Number NK 046

Click on photo for details

 

11/16" , 24K Gold plated silver Chai

on top of Sterling Silver

Price:  $ 84.95

  silver shade

3d Star of David necklace.jpg

Item Number NK 001/042

  Click on photo for details

 

Small size:  11/16" (18 mm) across.

Large size: 15/16" (23 mm) across.

Sterling Silver.

 

     Price:

small- $ 55

 

 

 large- $ 85

Item Number NK 003

Click on photo for details

 

 13/16", Sterling Silver with enamel.

 

Price: $ 49.95

was: $ 85

  Enamel color

Jewish jewelry Kabbalah Star of David

Item Number NK 053P

Click on photo for details

 

1 1/8", Sterling Silver. 

 engraved with Hebrew letters sequences from the Kabala

 

 

 

Price: $ 39.95

 

Merkab1.jpg (66388 bytes)

Item Number NK 054

Click on photo for details

 

7/8", Sterling Silver

 

 

 

 

 

  options

Item Number NK 060

Click on photo for details

 

1 1/8", Sterling Silver,  9K gold.

different stones available-click here

Price: $ 114.95

 Stone

Item Number NK 058

Click on photo for details

 

1", Sterling Silver, and 9K gold. 

different stones available-click here

Price: $ 179.95

 

 

  Stone

Item Number NK 034G

Click on photo for details

 

7/8", 3D Sterling Silver & 9K gold, with enamel .

Price: $ 69.95

 

 Enamel color

heart shape1.jpg (149330 bytes)

Item Number NK 030

Click on photo for details

 

 7/8", Sterling Silver

Price: $ 44.95

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item Number NK 053

Click on photo for details

 

1 1/8", Sterling Silver. 

Back side engraved with Hebrew letters sequences from the Kabala

Price: $ 44.95

 

 Enamel color

Item Number NK 056

Click on photo for details

 

7/8 "X 11/16", Sterling Silver, 24K gold plating .

Price: $ 74.95

 

 

   silver shade
 Stone

Item Number NK 032

Click on photo for details

 

7/8", Sterling Silver, with enamel .

Price: $ 49.95

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Enamel color

Item Number NK 034

Click on photo for details

 

7/8", Sterling Silver, with enamel .

Price: $ 49.95

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Enamel color

Item Number NK 059

Click on photo for details

 

1 ", Sterling Silver, 9K gold and gemstone

different stones available-click here

Price: $ 124.95

 

Stone

Item Number NK 038

Click on photo for details

 

 1/2", Sterling Silver

Price: $ 24.95

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14K kabalistic b1.jpg (25053 bytes)

Item Number NK 062

Click on photo for details

 

1 1/8", Solid 14K Gold, Not Including a chain

Price: $ 264.95

 

 

14K 3D1.jpg (54487 bytes)

Item Number NK 063

Click on photo for details

 

Small size:  11/16" (18 mm) across.

Large size: 15/16" (23 mm) across.

Solid 14K Gold,  Not Including a chain.

 

 

Price:

small - $ 264.95

 

large- $ 374.95

Item Number NK 080

Click on photo for details

 

7/8", Solid 14K Gold, Not Including a chain.

Price: $ 374.95

 

 

 

 

 

 

14K peace dove cut2.jpg (34908 bytes)

Item Number NK 061

Click on photo for details

 

9/16", Solid 14K Gold, Not Including a chain.

Price: $ 289.95

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Star of David necklace story:

The Shield of David or Magen David in Hebrew, is a generally recognized symbol of Jewish Community and Judaism.

ttps://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr" method="post"> It is named after King David of ancient Israel; and its usage began in the Middle Ages, alongside the more ancient symbol of the menorah. Geometrically it is the hexagram.

With the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948 the Star of David on the Flag of Israel has also become a symbol of Israel.

According to some Judaic sources, the Star/Shield of David signifies the number seven: that is, the six points plus the center. The earliest extant Jewish text to mention it is the Eshkol Ha-Kofer by a Karaite named Judah Hadassi, from the 12th century CE:

"The number seven has religious significance in Judaism, e.g., the six days of Creation plus the seventh day of rest, the six working days in the week plus Shabbat, the Seven Spirits of God, as well as the Menorah in the ancient Temple, whose seven oil lamps rest on three stems branching from each side of a central pole. And so on. Perhaps, the Star of David came to be used as a standard symbol in synagogues because its organization into 3+3+1 corresponds to the Temple's Menorah, which was the more traditional symbol for Judaism in ancient times.

Exact origins of the symbol's relation to Jewish identity are unknown. Several theories were put forward. According to one hypothesis the Star of David comprises two of the three letters in the name David. In its Hebrew spelling (γεγ), it contains only three characters, two of which are "D" (or "Dalet", in Hebrew). In ancient times, this letter was written in a form much like a triangle, similar to the Greek letter Delta (Δ), with which it shares a sound and the same (4th) position in their respective alphabets, as it does with Latin. The symbol may have been a simple family crest formed by flipping and juxtaposing the two most prominent letters in the name.

Some researchers have theorized that the hexagram represents the astrological chart at the time of David's birth or anointment as king. The hexagram is also known as the "King's Star" in astrological circles, and was an important astrological symbol in Zoroastrianism.

The earliest archaeological evidence for the Jewish use of the symbol comes from an inscription attributed to Joshua ben Asayahu in late 7th century BCE Sidon. [2]

"Practical" Kabbalah makes use of this sign, arranging the Ten Sephiroth (sefirot, spheres) in it, and placing it on amulets. However, the sign is nowhere to be found in classical kabbalistic texts themselves, such as the Zohar and the like. Therefore, its use as a sefirotic diagram in amulets is more likely a reinterpretation of a preexisting magical symbol. ,

 

Kabbalistically, the Star/Shield of David symbolizes the six directions of space plus the center, under the influence of the description of space found in the Sefer Yetsira: Up, Down, East, West, South, North, and Center. Congruently, under the influence of the Zohar, it represents the Six Sefirot of the Male (Zeir Anpin) united with the Seventh Sefirot of the Female (Nekuva).

The Shield of David is not mentioned in ancient rabbinic literature. A supposed David's shield however has recently been noted on a Jewish tombstone at Taranto, in Southern Italy, which may date as early as the third century CE. Likewise, a stone bearing the shield from the arch of a 3-4th century synagogue in the Galilee was found. [5]

The earliest Jewish literary source which mentions the "Shield of David" is the Eshkol Ha-Kofer by Judah Hadassi from the middle of the 12th century CE, where seven Shields are used in an amulet for a mezuzah. It appears to have been in use as part of amulets before it was in use in formal Jewish contexts. A manuscript Tanakh dated 1307 and belonging to Rabbi Yosef bar Yehuda ben Marvas from Toledo, Spain, was decorated with a Shield of David. In the synagogues, perhaps, it was associated with the mezuzah. Originally, the hexagram may have been employed as an architectural ornament on synagogues, as it is, for example, on the cathedrals of Brandenburg and Stendal, and on the Marktkirche at Hanover. A pentagram in this form is found on the ancient synagogue at Tell Hum.

The Star of David can be found on the tombstones of religious Jews going back hundreds of years in Europe, as it became accepted as the universal symbol of the Jewish people. Following Jewish emancipation after the French revolution, Jewish communities chose the Star of David to represent themselves, comparable to the cross used by most Christians.

Some Orthodox Jewish groups reject the use of the hexagram Star of David because of its association with [[magic (paranormal)|magic] Neturei Karta and Satmar reject it because they associate it with Zionism.

Many Modern Orthodox synagogues, and many synagogues of other Jewish movements, however have the Israeli flag with the Star of David prominently displayed at the front of the synagogues near the Ark containing the Torah scrolls.

Another interesting thing to Jews (and non-Jews alike) is that by highlighting lines of the Star of David that you can spell out every letter in the hebrew alphabet.